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Drug and Alcohol Treatment in New York City

New York City is a premiere tourist destination in the United States, a metropolis filled with museums, skyscrapers and musicals. However, statistics show that many residents of the Big Apple struggle with substance abuse. New York City’s five boroughs includes numerous treatment facilities, support group meetings and sober housing options intended to help reduce or prevent drug and alcohol abuse among its residents.

Rehab Centers and Support Groups

Drug and alcohol treatment centers in New York City use a full continuum of care to help individuals with addiction overcome substance abuse. For those looking for support group meetings, there are hundreds of gatherings throughout the city every week.

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Sober Environments in New York City

Sober living homes provide an environment conducive to sustaining sobriety. New York City offers numerous safe and secure sober living environments for those who need to avoid drugs or alcohol.

Government Initiatives in New York City

Numerous government programs in New York City are designed to reduce substance abuse in the area. These initiatives provide education, intervention and support for individuals battling addiction and for those in recovery.

NYC Well

NYC Well allows New Yorkers to speak with counselors via phone, text or online chat about problems associated with stress, depression, anxiety and substance abuse. Counselors can assist individuals in accessing mental health and substance misuse services.

The program provides services that include suicide prevention, crisis counseling and peer support. Representatives also offer assistance in scheduling appointments for mental health services.

The NYC Well Texting Service offers free information and support through text messaging. Counselors respond without judgement and offer resources to connect individuals or their loved ones with support.

The NYC Well website offers coping and wellness tips, including symptoms of stress and ways to ease tension.

Services are free and confidential. Interpreters are available for more than 200 languages. Counselors are available 24/7.

Thrive NYC

ThriveNYC is a comprehensive plan designed to tackle mental illness in New York City. The government-run program trains more than 250,000 New Yorkers in mental health first aid. This strategy empowers people to keep loved ones and co-workers healthy.

The public engagement campaign seeks to change the conversation about mental health in person and online. The movement strives to invest in early intervention and prevention, close treatment gaps and partner with local communities to create effective solutions to mental health problems.

New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene is a source of education for various health topics. Department epidemiologists study patterns, causes and effects of disease conditions in New York City neighborhoods. The city uses the information to shape its public health policy decisions.

The department’s website offers information on addiction, detailing the effects of drugs on the brain and the consequences of substance abuse. It also educates readers on prescription painkillers, alcohol use, overdose prevention and the benefits of harm reduction services, peer-based services and treatment.

The department also provides resources such as syringe exchange programs, overdose prevention providers and treatment centers.

OASAS

Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services (OASAS)

The Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services strives to improve the lives of New Yorkers battling drug, alcohol and gambling addictions. The agency uses comprehensive prevention, treatment and recovery services to accomplish this task.

OASAS monitors substance abuse trends throughout the state. The office also promotes public awareness through community action groups and connects people within the criminal justice system with addiction services.

The agency promotes the education and training of professionals working with these individuals. It also administers the credentialing of substance abuse counselors, prevention practitioners and prevention specialists.

The agency operates outreach campaigns designed to reduce addiction and the use of heroin and synthetic drugs. Its Talk2Prevent campaign educates parents and community coalitions on talking to children about alcohol abuse and preventing high-risk college drinking.

New York City Drug Court Initiative

Drug courts place nonviolent drug offenders battling substance abuse into treatment rather than jail. These programs aim to reduce substance abuse, addiction, crime and recidivism rates.

The Drug Courts of New York City Criminal Court includes nine drug courts. Criminal courts operate in Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens and Staten Island. New York City drug courts abide by the same principles, though each operates independently.

From 1998 to 2014, the city saw 9,471 drug court pleas. About 55 percent of drug court participants in 2014 were arraigned on felony charges. Forty percent of participants in 2014 were arraigned on misdemeanor charges.

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Drug Trends in Greater NYC Area

Cocaine, heroin and marijuana use was common in New York City during the first half of 2013, according to a 2014 report by the National Institute on Drug Abuse. This information is based on treatment admission data and results from state and local drug analyses collected by the National Forensic Laboratory Information System.

NYC Drug Trends:
Cocaine

Cocaine

In 2013, cocaine remained a major problem in New York City, according to the NIDA report. Treatment for cocaine-related problems decreased from 14 percent during the first half of 2012 to 13 percent during the first half of 2013.

Many individuals treated for cocaine issues had a primary, secondary and tertiary problem with the drug. Also, the substance represented 32.2 percent of all drug reports analyzed by NFLIS labs during the first half of 2013.

Heroin

Heroin

Heroin was involved in 26 percent of all primary treatment admissions in New York City during the first half of 2013. During this time, 43 percent of people admitted for heroin use cited injections as their primary method of administration.

During the first half of 2013, NFLIS laboratories identified 11.6 percent of drug reports as heroin.

On average, 300 people per year died of an opioid overdose in New York City from 2009 to 2013, according to the New York State Department of Health. This represented more than 35 percent of all opioid-related deaths in New York during this period

To combat a growing opioid epidemic, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced in 2015 that naloxone would immediately be available without a prescription in pharmacies across the city. Naloxone is an opioid overdose reversal drug.

Heroin Trends in NYC

Source: New York/New Jersey High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area Drug Trends Group

In September 2016, The New York City Council allocated $100,000 to the city health department to fund a nine-month study that would help determine whether to open supervised injection facilities in the city. These locations would allow intravenous drug users to inject under medical supervision.

New York officials say these facilities may help prevent drug overdoses, reduce HIV and viral hepatitis transmissions, and connect addicts with substance abuse treatment options.

“It’s been done and been implemented in other areas [of the world], so we just want to look up what the viability would be in New York,” Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito told the New York Post.

Weed

Marijuana/Cannabis

Marijuana treatment admissions represented 25 percent of all treatment admissions in New York City during the first half of 2013. More people in treatment had a primary, secondary or tertiary problem with marijuana than with any other drug.

Also, 33.6 percent of drug reports among items analyzed by NFLIS lab during the first half of 2013 were marijuana, the highest proportion of any drug during that time.

From January to March 2016, the NYPD arrested 4,225 people for marijuana possession, according to the New York Daily News. The department arrested 9,786 people from Jan. 1 to May 31.

Meth

Methamphetamine

Methamphetamine treatment admissions and NFLIS lab drug reports among analyzed drug items were at low levels during the first half of 2013. During that time, methamphetamine ranked 11th among all NFLIS lab drug reports. In 2012, the drug ranked 16th among all drug reports.

However, meth use has increased among gay men in New York City. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention surveys gay and bisexual men every 3 to 4 years in cities with high HIV rates. The number of gay men who reported past-year meth use more than doubled from 2011 to 2014.

Opioids

Prescription Opioids

Opioid analgesic overdose death rates increased by 50 percent from 2005 to 2012, per the NIDA report. Opioid analgesic overdose death rates increased by 233 percent among Staten Islanders during this period.

Primary treatment admissions for prescription opioids remained low during the first half of 2013. However, admissions increased in proportion to other drugs in recent years.

During the first half of 2013, prescription drugs represented a small portion of drug reports among items analyzed by NFLIS labs. However, oxycodone was involved in 1,094 drug reports during that time, the 4th most among all drugs.

On average, 300 people per year died of an opioid overdose in New York City from 2009 to 2013, according to the New York State Department of Health. This represented more than 35 percent of all opioid-related deaths in New York during this period.

To combat a growing opioid epidemic, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced in 2015 the availability of naloxone without prescription in pharmacies across the city. Naloxone is an opioid overdose reversal drug.

“Last year, this city experienced the equivalent of more than one fatal opioid overdose a day,” de Blasio said in a statement. “These are people whose lives, once filled with promise, have been upended, leaving families to struggle with deep, lasting pain. We won’t accept this as our fate as a city — and we’ve resolved to do something about it.”

Manhattan

Manhattan is the most densely populated of New York City’s five boroughs. New York County is home to world-famous attractions, such as Central Park, the Empire State Building, One World Trade Center, Times Square and Broadway.

Despite its bright lights, Manhattan has a dark drug problem. However, numerous government, nonprofit and college programs in New York County have been implemented to combat this epidemic.

Drug Trends in Manhattan

About 22 percent of opioid-related emergency department visits within New York City’s five boroughs in 2014 occurred in Manhattan, according to the New York State Department of Health. This represents the third highest rate among the five boroughs.

New York County experienced an average of 131 drug overdose deaths per year from 2009 to 2013, according to the state report. During this time, the county experienced an annual average of 30 heroin overdose deaths and 49 opioid overdose deaths.

Source: New York State Department of Health

According to the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, 136 Manhattan residents died from unintentional overdose in 2013. The overdose death rate among black residents was more than double that of white residents.

Cocaine-involved overdose death rates were higher than heroin-involved overdose death rates each year from 2000 to 2013.

Substance Abuse Prevention Initiatives in Manhattan

Manhattan fights substance abuse through numerous prevention programs. Many government and nonprofit initiatives aim to reduce drug and alcohol abuse in New York County.

School Services

In addition to preparing students for life after college, many colleges in Manhattan steer students clear of drug and alcohol abuse. These institutions implement various initiatives to reduce substance abuse on campus and educate students on living healthy lives.

Columbia University

Columbia University

Columbia University, located in Upper Manhattan, offers counseling to students struggling with low self-esteem, depression or substance abuse. Individual, short-term counseling sessions last about 45 minutes.

The Counseling and Psychological Services department also offers referrals for longer-term therapy, student-life support groups, and medication and emergency consultations.

The Department of Psychiatry at Columbia University is known for its psychiatric research, education and clinical care. The department researches anxiety and mood disorders, eating disorders, schizophrenia, personality disorders and numerous other public health topics.

Columbia Psychiatry also hosts seminars on substance abuse presented by mental health counselors. These lectures address substance abuse topics, such as epidemiological studies, the root of dependency and the effectiveness of treatment.

Incoming students take part in the Responsible Community @ Columbia program, which offers peer-facilitated sessions that foster dialogue about substance abuse. The program also establishes social norms associated with drug and alcohol use.

The Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students (BASICS) program is intended to help students examine their drinking behaviors and drug use. The program is designed to reduce risky behaviors and harmful consequences of substance abuse.

Columbia University’s website offers information about alcohol use, including protective behaviors, symptoms of alcohol poisoning and blood alcohol content. The website also includes an alcohol self-assessment.

New York University

New York University

New York University, located near Washington Square Park in Manhattan, offers numerous services, programs and resources for people struggling with substance abuse.

NYU’s website provides information and statistics associated with alcohol use, including rates of binge drinking. It also contains information on prescription drug use, cigarette smoking, mental health, stress and substance use behaviors.

Counseling and Wellness Services offers free and confidential assistance to NYU students who believe they may have substance abuse problems. These services include crisis intervention, individual psychotherapy, group counseling, medication management and referrals for treatment programs and support groups.

The school’s Substance Assessment, Feedback and Evaluation (SAFE) program encourages students to examine their substance use behaviors. The program teaches students how to reduce high-risk behaviors and harmful consequences associated with drug use, identify triggers and develop skills to promote change.

NYU also offers BASICS, an alcohol skills training program. The initiative provides in-depth substance use assessments, myths about substance use effects, facts on social norms, ways to reduce future risks and resources to reduce drug use.

Counseling and Wellness Services also offers Choices and Change, a harm-reduction group where students discuss their substance use, identify motivations and triggers, and consider making changes in their behavior.

Other support groups include:

The Wellness Exchange, a private hotline, is available 24/7 for students with concerns or questions about substance use.

Juilliard School

Juilliard School

Juilliard School, located on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, offers free counseling services for students who want to address their emotional, psychological and mental health needs.

The school’s website provides information about Julliard’s substance use policy, the health risks associated with drug use and alcohol abuse, and resources for those struggling with substance abuse.

The Office of Student Affairs offers events and activities that engage and inform students on public health topics, such as drug and alcohol use, nutrition and time management. Its social, educational and cultural events aim to improve the overall health and well-being of the Julliard student body.

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Brooklyn

Brooklyn offers an array of attractions for residents and travelers. The borough is home to the Barclays Center, Prospect Park, the Brooklyn Bridge and a booming downtown scene.

While Kings County has experienced its share of drug use, the area includes many initiatives designed to decrease substance abuse.

Drug Trends in Brooklyn

Among the city’s five boroughs, Brooklyn had the highest number of opioid-related emergency department visits in 2014, according to the New York State Department of Health. Kings County experienced an average of 185 drug overdose deaths each year from 2009 to 2013.

Source: New York State Department of Health

Brooklyn had the second-lowest rate of unintentional drug overdose among New York City’s five boroughs in 2013, according to the New York Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. That year, the rate of drug overdose was 8.2 per 100,000 residents.

From 2004 to 2013, the rate of cocaine-involved overdose deaths among Brooklyn residents decreased by 43 percent. However, the rate of heroin-involved overdoses increased by 56 percent from 2010 to 2013.

On July 12, 2016, dozens of people were hospitalized for overdosing on K2, a synthetic drug. The incident took place along the border of Bedford-Stuyvesant and Bushwick.

“It’s like a scene out of a zombie movie, a horrible scene,” Brian Arthur, 38, told the New York Times. Arthur watched three people collapse as he made his way to work in the morning and began live-streaming the episode on Facebook.

“This drug truly paralyzed people,” he said.

New York City had more than 6,000 emergency department visits involving K2 in 2015, according to the New York City health department.

Substance Abuse Prevention Initiatives in Brooklyn

Brooklyn is home to various drug and alcohol abuse prevention programs. Many government programs and nonprofit initiatives exist to decrease substance abuse in Kings County.

College Services

Colleges in Brooklyn support initiatives to reduce and prevent substance abuse among students. These initiatives include counseling services, awareness activities, self-help assessments and online resources.

Brooklyn College logo

Brooklyn College

Brooklyn College, located in Brooklyn’s Midwood neighborhood, offers drug and alcohol abuse counseling services to students, employees and their families. Counseling takes place at the Office of Personal Counseling Services.

Professionals and trained, supervised students provide assistance through individual and group counseling as well as referrals to off-campus resources. A special support group is available for people in recovery.

The use of tobacco products — such as cigarettes, cigars, pipes, e-cigarettes and chewing tobacco — is prohibited on campus at Brooklyn College. The college supports community efforts to reduce or eliminate tobacco use in public settings.

The Brooklyn College Health Clinic offers smoking cessation resources. The clinic also evaluates and treats common medical conditions, such as anxiety and depression. The college’s higher education case manager can issue referrals for students dealing with substance abuse problems.

Pratt Institute logo

Pratt Institute

Pratt Institute, located in the Clinton Hill neighborhood of Brooklyn, offers counseling and psychotherapy services to its students. These services assist students with relationship problems, depression, anxiety and family difficulties.

In addition to the BASICS program, Pratt also offers Cannabis Abuse Screening and Intervention for College Students (CASICS), a marijuana use self-assessment. The programs help students examine their own drinking behaviors and marijuana use.

The institution hosts weekly Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) meetings. AA is an international fellowship of men and women who have had a drinking problem. Meetings take place on campus on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

Pratt’s website provides information on the dangers of prescription drug abuse and symptoms of excessive drinking and alcohol overdose. The website also offers resources for people battling addiction or in recovery.

St. Francis College logo

St. Francis College

Located in Brooklyn Heights, St. Francis College has numerous resources for people with substance abuse issues.

Student Health Services provides students with medical and psychological assistance, information on wellness, workshops and resources for overcoming an emotional crisis.

The college offers Alcohol-Wise, an online alcohol education program intended to assist students in making healthy choices regarding alcohol. All resident students, athletes, student club members and SGA representatives must complete the course.

St. Francis College also provides Greek-Wise, an online education program created to assist fraternity and sorority members in making healthy alcohol decisions. A session lasts about an hour and 15 minutes.

The institution runs ULifeline, an online resource that provides information on college mental health. The ULifeline website includes information on anxiety disorders, drugs and alcohol, eating disorders and more. It also teaches students how to develop healthy lifestyles.

Queens

Located across the East River from Manhattan, Queens is home to breathtaking parks, world-class sporting events and international cuisines.

While drug abuse occurs in Queens, its rate of overdose deaths in 2013 was lower than any other borough. Still, many nonprofits in Queens work to prevent substance abuse in the area.

Drug Trends in Queens

Twelve percent of opioid-related emergency department visits within New York City’s five boroughs in 2014 occurred in Queens County, according to the New York State Department of Health. The county experienced an annual average of 138 drug overdose deaths from 2009 to 2013.

Queens experienced a mean annual frequency of 60 overdose deaths involving opioid analgesics from 2009 to 2013, according to the state report.

Source: New York State Department of Health

Among residents of New York City’s five boroughs, Queens residents had the lowest rate of unintentional overdose deaths in 2013, according to the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. However, the rate of overdose deaths in Queens increased by 38 percent from 2012 to 2013.

Heroin overdose rates in Queens have climbed in recent years. Heroin-involved overdose death rates increased by 126 percent from 2010 to 2013. Benzodiazepine-involved overdose death rates increased 179 percent from 2000 to 2013.

Substance Abuse Prevention Initiatives in Queens

Queens is home to many substance abuse prevention initiatives, from drug courts to counseling and prevention programs.

College Services in Queens

College Services

Colleges in Queens support students battling substance abuse. Queens College and St. John’s University provide numerous resources for reducing drug and alcohol abuse in students’ lives.

Queens College logo

Queens College

Queens College knows the importance of developing healthy lifestyles. The college’s Health Service Center provides free or low-cost resources, consultations, referrals and educational programs intended to improve the well-being of students, faculty and staff.

The Health Services center offers health education and counseling to students, staff and faculty. These topics include drug and alcohol use, healthy eating and health promotion. The center also provides resources associated with drug and alcohol use, eating disorders and emotional health.

The college participates in the Healthy CUNY Tobacco Free Initiative, which prohibits tobacco use on campus. Its website provides information on the health benefits of quitting smoking and smoking cessation resources.

St. John’s University logo

St. John’s University

St. John’s University is dedicated to being one of the healthiest college campuses in the United States.

The Center for Counseling & Consultation provides support to students coping with personal or emotional problems. The center addresses issues such as stress, anxiety, family or social concerns, relationship difficulties, grief, trauma and substance abuse.

Its Wellness Education and Prevention Services team assists students in creating a wellness kit, which includes strategies for balanced living. The wellness team engages students and collaborates with other departments to create programs, events and services that increase awareness of numerous health-related issues.

St. John’s strives to prevent student alcohol abuse. The college offers AlcoholEdu for College, a nationwide alcohol prevention initiative that educates students about alcohol consumption, including its effects and consequences.

The BASICS program offers guidance to students who have violated the college’s alcohol and other drug policy. These students are referred to take an online inventory of their substance use. They also meet with representatives of the wellness center.

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Staten Island

Staten Island is rich with tradition and eclectic culture. New York City’s southernmost borough is known for its museums, historic landmarks, beaches and parkland, including the Staten Island Greenbelt, the city’s largest forest preserve.

However, statistics show drug use is common in Richmond County. Government and nonprofit initiatives exist throughout the borough, each designed to reduce substance abuse in the area.

Drug Trends in Staten Island

In New York City, the rate of overdose deaths involving opioid analgesics in 2015 was highest among Staten Island residents, according to the New York City Department of Mental Health and Hygiene.

The rates of unintentional drug overdose deaths in Staten Island increased by 138 percent from 2000 to 2013. Five percent of opioid-related emergency department visits within New York City in 2014 occurred in Richmond County. This represents the lowest rate among the five boroughs.

Source: New York State Department of Health

On average, Richmond County experienced 71 drug overdose deaths per year from 2009 to 2013, according to the New York State Department of Health. The county also experienced an annual average of 11 heroin overdose deaths during that time.

Substance Abuse Prevention Initiatives in Staten Island

Numerous government agencies, nonprofit organizations and higher education institutions in Staten Island fight substance abuse.

College Services in Staten Island

College Services

Colleges in Staten Island strive to reduce drug use and alcohol abuse among students. They work to accomplish this goal through awareness campaigns, prevention initiatives, counseling services and online resources.

The College of Staten Island logo

The College of Staten Island

The College of Staten Island, a senior college of The City University of New York, provides health and wellness services to its students. These services include alcohol and drug prevention workshops, smoking cessation education and health promotion events.

The college also offers eCHECKUP TO GO, an online self-assessment survey that helps students gauge their drinking and drug use habits. Students who complete the online assessment receive confidential, personalized feedback.

The Counseling Center provides crisis, group and individual counseling to students. Crisis counseling benefits students experiencing immediate or extreme distress. Often, these students battle depression, anxiety, PTSD or other mental health disorders.

Group counseling teaches students coping skills. These services offer support, skill building and personal growth to students.

Individual counseling is available for people experiencing family issues, depression, stress, substance abuse, loneliness, isolation or suicidal feelings.

Wagner College logo

Wagner College

Wagner College provides drug education, counseling and rehabilitation. The institution’s Employee Assistant Program is available to faculty and staff, and students struggling with substance abuse can benefit from community resources.

The college offers peer education groups, including Students Empowering for Change (SECs). SECs is a group dedicated to fostering a safe and inclusive campus environment through the use of peer-to-peer communication.

SECs inspires students by providing information about responsible decision-making and positive role modeling. The organization includes subgroups that focus on health-related topics, including drugs and alcohol, diversity, wellness and healthy relationships.

Wagner College includes online resources associated with addiction, eating disorders, smoking, recovery, suicide prevention and mental health on its website.

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The Bronx

The Bronx, New York City’s northernmost borough, is the home of the New York Yankees, the Bronx Zoo and the Bronx Museum of the Arts. Bronx County is the third most densely populated county in the United States, though a quarter of its area is open space.

In recent years, many Bronx residents have battled substance abuse. Numerous organizations and institutions in Bronx County have developed programs to reduce drug and alcohol abuse throughout the borough.

Drug Trends in the Bronx

Among residents of New York City’s five boroughs, Bronx residents had the second highest rate of unintentional drug overdose deaths in 2013, per the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.

Twenty-six percent of opioid-related emergency department visits within New York City’s five boroughs in 2014 occurred in the Bronx, according to the New York State Department of Health.

Source: New York State Department of Health

Bronx County experienced an average of 129 drug overdose deaths per year from 2009 to 2013, according to the New York State Department of Health. The county experienced an average frequency of 41 heroin overdose deaths each year during that time.

The Bronx had the highest rate of heroin treatment admissions out of any borough in 2013, according to the New York/New Jersey High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area Drug Trends Group.

Substance Abuse Prevention Initiatives in the Bronx

To combat area substance abuse, numerous organizations in the Bronx implement programs designed to reduce drug or alcohol abuse.

College Services

Higher education institutions in the Bronx have implemented numerous strategies to prevent substance abuse among students.

Fordham University logo

Fordham University

Fordham University offers various resources intended to reduce substance abuse on campus. The Alcohol and Other Drug Education (AODE) office uses education, environmental management, early interventions and assessments to combat student substance abuse.

The school’s Freshman CORE Programming is designed to change a student’s knowledge, attitudes and behavioral intentions associated with alcohol and other drug use. The AODE program educates first-year students on preventive strategies and secondhand consequences related to substance abuse.

BASICS is a program through which students and trained facilitators meet for one-on-one informational sessions. The program informs students of their drinking patterns, history and behaviors. Students also learn ways to reduce the health, social and legal risks associated with alcohol consumption.

Fordham’s website offers information on smoking, including facts, statistics and cessation resources. The electronic THC Online Knowledge Experience (e-TOKE) is a self-assessment that provides students with detailed, personalized feedback on their marijuana use.

In September 2009, the college implemented the AODE Safe Birthday Campaign. The AODE office sends a birthday card to students on their 21st birthday. Each card contains safe drinking tips, a personalized message and a list of popular sober locations to celebrate.

Manhattan College logo

Manhattan College

Manhattan College, located in the Fieldston neighborhood of the Bronx, combats student substance abuse through myriad services.

The Counseling Center provides advice to students on managing their anxiety, stress and depression. The center offers additional assistance, including student groups, online screenings, educational programs, crisis intervention and referrals to local mental health resources.

Designated drug and alcohol counselors are available. These counselors provide substance use education presentations in residence halls each semester. They also work privately with students battling substance abuse.

The Alcohol-Wise program is a one-hour online course on alcohol abuse and prevention. All incoming undergraduate students complete the program.

The school also gets parents involved. Manhattan College sends letters to parents or guardians of incoming freshmen encouraging parents to speak with their sons or daughters about alcohol consumption in college.

Lehman College logo

Lehman College

Lehman College, located in the Jerome Park neighborhood of North Bronx, offers workshops on drugs, alcohol, cigarettes and food disorders. The school also provides students with pamphlets, books, videos and audios to increase awareness and provide information on substance abuse.

The school’s website offers information on the health risks associated with alcohol abuse and the use of tobacco. Individual counseling, group counseling and referrals are also available.

Vocational Opportunities in New York City

Recovery marks the start of a new life. Often, this means searching for a new job. New York City has numerous vocational assistance options for people looking for work.

NYC Office of Workforce Development

NYC Office of Workforce Development

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio created the Mayor’s Office of Workforce Development (WKDEV) in 2014. WKDEV coordinates the workforce with economic development in the boroughs, helps businesses meet their workforce needs, and assists New Yorkers in finding quality jobs with opportunities for advancement.

The Jobs for New Yorkers Task Force is a group of stakeholders who work to expand job opportunities for New York residents. The task force invests in workforce programs and educational resources to serve the unemployed and underemployed.

The HireNYC program provides free, high-quality recruitment services to vendors and businesses and connects New Yorkers with these jobs. Through the program, city residents have access to thousands of job opportunities.

NYC Human Resources Administration

NYC Human Resources Administration

New York City’s Human Resources Administration (HRA) offers a wide range of resources and services to people searching for jobs and employers looking for workers.

NYC Business Link is a free employment service provided by the NYC Human Resources Administration. The program helps New Yorkers search for jobs and assists workers in improving on-the-job performance.

Located on William Street in Manhattan, HRA Business Link offers free job placement for those receiving cash assistance, housing support or any other form of financial assistance.

HRA’s employment services help those receiving cash assistance with job search support, training, resume writing and literacy. The Back to Work program provides job readiness training, placement services and vocational training to applicants and recipients of cash assistance.

HRA also offers TXT-2-Work, which sends text messages about job opportunities to people using financial assistance programs.

WorkForce1

WorkForce1

Provided by the NYC Department of Small Business Services, Workforce1 connects qualified workers with job opportunities in New York City. The agency uses recruitment expertise, industry knowledge and skill-building workshops to strengthen a candidate’s employment opportunities.

The agency forms relationships with businesses. Workforce1 representatives learn what these businesses desire in potential candidates and use this information to connect workers to employers.

A Workforce1 center can be found in the Bronx, Brooklyn, Upper and Midtown Manhattan, Queens and Staten Island.

CareerZone

CareerZone

CareerZone allows people to explore careers related to their strengths, skills and talents.

The online resource provides relevant occupational and labor market information, job postings, interactive middle and high school career portfolios, and links to college exploration and planning resources to help youth begin work.

The program includes more than 450 career videos that help jobseekers visualize the workplace and bring careers to life. CareerZone also offers self-assessments that filter available jobs to match your interests.

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