Drug & Alcohol Rehab in New Mexico

Get the treatment you need to recover from addiction in New Mexico. The state has resources and support to aid you on your journey to sobriety.

Top Rehab Facilities in New Mexico

Numerous drug rehab facilities in New Mexico provide evidence-based treatment for substance use disorders. The top facilities are accredited by organizations that guarantee they meet standards for quality services. You can find quality detox centers, outpatient facilities and residential treatment providers in the state. Several facilities accept Indian Health Service, Medicaid and other federal funds.

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Google Map of Central New Mexico Treatment Center

Central New Mexico Treatment Center

630 Haines Ave. NW, Albuquerque, NM 87102

505-268-5611

Google Map of A New Awakening Counseling

A New Awakening Counseling

600 First St. NW Ste. 200, Albuquerque, NM 87102

505-224-9124

Google Map of Turquoise Lodge Hospital

Turquoise Lodge Hospital

5901 Zuni Road SE, Albuquerque, NM 87108

505-841-8928

Google Map of University of New Mexico Hospital

University of New Mexico Hospital

2600 Yale Blvd. SE, Albuquerque, NM 87106

505-994-7999

Google Map of Turning Point Recovery Center

Turning Point Recovery Center

9201 Montgomery Blvd. NE Bldg. 5, Albuquerque, NM 87111

505-217-1717

doctor filling out paperwork

Top Reasons for Addiction Treatment

Nearly 5,000 people sought treatment for substance abuse in New Mexico in 2015. Alcohol addiction was the most common reason people went to rehab, and opioid addiction accounted for the second most treatment admissions.

Most Common Reasons for Entering Addiction Treatment in New Mexico in 2015:

  • Alcohol: 1,815 admissions
  • Alcohol & Another Drug: 504 admissions
  • Prescription Opioids: 520 admissions
  • Heroin: 444 admissions
  • Amphetamines: 309 admissions
  • Marijuana: 217 admissions
  • Cocaine: 68 admissions

The number of people seeking treatment for addiction to amphetamines, such as crystal meth or Adderall, has declined in recent years. The number of marijuana treatment admissions has also dropped.

New Mexico sunset

Impact of Drug Addiction in New Mexico

Heroin and other opioids have devastated New Mexico during the past decade. In 2015, the state ranked eighth in the country for drug-related deaths, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. An estimated 501 people died from drug overdoses that year.

Opioids contribute to the majority of drug overdose deaths in the state. Heroin deaths increased between 2014 and 2015, but the number of deaths from natural opioids (e.g., codeine or morphine), semisynthetic opioids (e.g., oxycodone or hydrocodone) and synthetic opioids (e.g., methadone or fentanyl) decreased during the same time frame.

Types of Opioid Deaths in New Mexico, 2014-2015
Type 2014 2015 % Change
Natural & Semisynthetic 223 160 -25.7
Methadone 45 33 -30.4
Synthetic (not including methadone) 66 42 -36.4
Heroin 139 156 +12.5
Total 473 391 -17.3
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Trends in Youth Substance Abuse Among New Mexico High Schoolers

The most recent New Mexico Youth Risk & Resiliency Survey indicated that rates of current alcohol use, binge drinking, and drinking and driving dropped significantly between 2005 and 2015.

Percent of New Mexico High Schoolers Who Had Ever Used Various Illicit Drugs

Graph of high schoolers using illicit drugs Source: 2015 High School Youth Risk Behavior Survey

Cocaine, Ecstasy, heroin and methamphetamine use rates were each higher than the national average.

woman staring off into sunset in the mountains

Q&A with Dr. Bill Wiese, Former Director of New Mexico’s Public Health Division

Bill Wiese

Dr. Bill Wiese

  • Former Professor at the University of New Mexico
  • Former Director of New Mexico’s Public Health Division
  • Former Chair of New Mexico’s Drug Policy Task Force

What is the status of the drug epidemic in New Mexico?

Our ranking has improved a little bit with the worsening of the situation in the Northeast with fentanyl, which we’ve been relatively spared from, but our averages have been consistently twice the national average for the past 15 years. … We’ve been plateaued in terms of prescription opioid deaths for the past five years or so. Heroin has gone up.

How does New Mexico’s prescription drug monitoring program combat prescription drug abuse?

Virtually every prescription for a controlled substance moves into a database. It’s our effort to reduce unwanted prescriptions. We’ve got very good data on what’s being prescribed, how much and who’s doing it. Fortunately, we haven’t had a lot of pill mills. … Nevertheless, there’s still a lot of very poor pain management and overprescribing, and this is one of the areas we’re working on and making progress.

How accessible is medication-assisted treatment in New Mexico?

We’re starting to work with major physicians groups to get better prescribing and get more people involved in medication-assisted treatment with Suboxone providers. Fortunately, we do better in our states than most states. But we still have way too few providers of Suboxone. We’re trying to understand the barriers that are keeping providers from doing it.

What factors prevent people from recovering from addiction in the state?

Our limiting factors are our capacities for putting people in long-term maintenance treatment. We have very poor support and capacity for the further end of treatment in terms of rehab step-down capacity. Part of that has to do with Medicaid. We’re trying to work with Medicaid.

What types of progress have been made in recent years?

The national publicity has greatly escalated. This is now front and center of political policy at the national level. None of that existed three years ago.

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